Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

Video Camera.

Video cameras are an essential tool for documentary filmmakers, providing the means to capture real-life events and stories in a dynamic visual format. With advancements in technology, modern video cameras offer higher resolution, improved low-light performance, and streamlined portability, allowing filmmakers to capture footage in various environments with ease.

The versatility of video cameras also enables filmmakers to experiment with different shooting styles, such as handheld or tripod-mounted shots, adding a layer of creativity to their storytelling.

Documentary filmmakers can benefit from the wide range of features offered by professional-grade video cameras, including adjustable frame rates, customizable exposure settings, and manual focus controls for precise image capture.

Additionally, the availability of interchangeable lenses allows filmmakers to adapt their equipment to specific shooting conditions and creative preferences. The capability of modern video cameras to record high-quality audio directly on the device further simplifies the filmmaking process and reduces the need for additional recording equipment.

Professional Video Camera.

Professional video cameras are essential tools for documentary filmmakers, offering high-quality recording capabilities and versatility. They provide the ability to capture stunning visuals and exceptional audio, crucial for creating compelling storytelling.

With advanced features such as manual focus, adjustable frame rates, and interchangeable lenses, professional video cameras enable filmmakers to adapt to different shooting conditions and achieve a cinematic look.

One of the key advantages of professional video cameras is their robust build quality and durability, designed to withstand rigorous use in various environments. This reliability ensures that filmmakers can focus on capturing authentic moments without worrying about equipment failure.

Additionally, professional video cameras offer greater control over settings such as white balance, exposure, and audio levels, empowering filmmakers to create visually impactful content with precision.

Moreover, professional video cameras often come equipped with advanced image stabilization technology, reducing the impact of camera shake during handheld shooting.

This feature is particularly beneficial for documentary filmmakers who need to capture dynamic movement while maintaining visual stability. Overall, investing in a professional video camera is an essential choice for documentary filmmakers seeking to elevate the quality and professionalism of their work.

Audio Inputs.

Audio inputs play a crucial role in capturing high-quality sound for documentary filmmaking. Whether it’s dialogue, ambient noise, or music, having the right audio inputs can make all the difference in the final product.

Filmmakers have a variety of options when it comes to audio inputs, ranging from built-in microphones on cameras to external lavalier and shotgun mics. Each input type offers different benefits and limitations, so understanding how to leverage them effectively is essential.

One of the key considerations for documentary filmmakers is selecting audio inputs that are versatile and adaptable to different shooting environments. For example, using a wireless lavalier microphone can provide freedom of movement for subjects while still capturing clear dialogue in noisy or outdoor settings.

On the other hand, shotgun microphones excel at capturing directional sound and are ideal for interviews or capturing specific sounds within a scene. By carefully considering the unique characteristics of each audio input option, filmmakers can choose the best tools for creating immersive and engaging auditory experiences in their documentaries.

Full-sized Manual Controls.

Full-sized manual controls can be a game-changer for documentary filmmakers. They offer precise control over settings such as aperture, shutter speed, and focus, allowing for more creative freedom and a higher level of customization in capturing footage. The tactile nature of manipulating these controls can also enhance the filmmaker’s connection to the camera, resulting in a more intuitive shooting experience.

Furthermore, full-sized manual controls often provide better durability and reliability compared to their digital counterparts. This is particularly advantageous in documentary filmmaking where unpredictable environments and long shooting hours are common.

Having physical knobs and dials that can withstand wear and tear ensures consistent performance throughout the production process, ultimately leading to greater consistency in the quality of footage captured.

Whether it’s adjusting exposure on-the-fly or smoothly transitioning focus between subjects, full-sized manual controls empower filmmakers with the tools they need to tell compelling visual stories with precision.

LED Video Panels.

LED video panels have revolutionized the way documentary filmmakers capture and display visuals. These panels offer exceptional brightness and clarity, allowing for crisp, vivid imagery even in challenging lighting conditions. The ability to seamlessly link multiple panels together provides flexibility in creating larger display surfaces or unique visual effects, enhancing the storytelling potential of any documentary project.

One notable advantage of LED video panels is their versatility in both indoor and outdoor settings. With their durable design and high resistance to environmental factors, these panels are suitable for capturing footage in a wide range of locations, from bustling city streets to remote natural landscapes.

Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

Additionally, the energy-efficient nature of LED technology ensures extended operational periods without compromising on visual quality, making them an ideal choice for documentary filmmakers seeking reliable equipment for extended shoots.

Documentary filmmakers can also benefit from the adaptability of LED video panels in various aspect ratios and configurations. This flexibility allows for seamless integration with different camera setups and shooting styles, enabling creative expression while maintaining consistent visual appeal across diverse scenes and subjects.

With their sleek profile and lightweight construction, LED video panels offer portability without sacrificing performance, empowering filmmakers to efficiently capture compelling content on location.

Rechargeable Batteries.

Rechargeable batteries have revolutionized the way documentary filmmakers power their equipment, offering a sustainable and cost-effective solution for extended shoots. By opting for rechargeable batteries, filmmakers reduce their environmental impact and long-term expenses while maintaining reliable power sources.

This shift away from single-use batteries also aligns with the growing sustainability movement within the film industry, showcasing a commitment to reducing waste and carbon footprint.

The versatility of rechargeable batteries allows filmmakers to seamlessly transition between different shooting locations without concern over constantly purchasing new disposable batteries.

With advancements in battery technology, filmmakers can now rely on high-capacity rechargeable options that provide longer-lasting power for their cameras, lights, and sound equipment. This flexibility not only streamlines the production process but also enhances mobility and efficiency during documentary shoots.

Audio Adapters.

Audio adapters play a crucial role in ensuring high-quality sound recording for documentary filmmakers. With the constant evolution of camera technology, having the right audio adapter can bridge the gap between new and traditional equipment. The versatility of audio adapters allows filmmakers to connect a wide range of microphones, from lavaliers to shotgun mics, to their cameras or recording devices.

These adapters also enable filmmakers to control and monitor the audio levels, ensuring that they capture clear and balanced sound in various shooting conditions.

Additionally, with the emergence of wireless microphones as a popular choice for interviews and on-location recording, audio adapters provide seamless integration between wireless systems and cameras, giving filmmakers flexibility without compromising on sound quality.

Overall, having the right audio adapter in your filmmaking toolkit is essential for capturing professional-grade audio that elevates the overall quality of your documentary productions.

DSLR Viewfinder.

The DSLR viewfinder is an essential tool for documentary filmmakers, offering a direct and intimate connection with the subject matter. Its optical design provides a clear, real-time view of the scene, allowing for precise framing and composition.

With its magnification and diopter adjustment, the viewfinder ensures sharp focus, even in challenging lighting conditions. This level of control is invaluable when capturing authentic moments in a fast-paced documentary setting.

In addition to aiding composition and focus, the DSLR viewfinder also serves as a crucial storytelling tool. By immersing the filmmaker in the scene, it enables them to anticipate pivotal moments and capture raw emotions with authenticity.

This sense of immediacy can be especially powerful when documenting unscripted events or intimate interviews. The viewfinder becomes a window into the world of the subject, fostering empathy and understanding that translates into compelling visual narratives.

Digital Audio Recorder.

Digital audio recorders have revolutionized the way documentary filmmakers capture sound, offering unparalleled clarity and ease of use. These powerful devices provide filmmakers with the ability to capture every nuance of dialogue, ambient noise, and music with stunning precision.

With features such as multi-channel recording, high-quality built-in microphones, and adjustable gain controls, digital audio recorders offer unmatched versatility in capturing a wide range of sounds in diverse environments.

Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

In addition to their exceptional audio quality, digital audio recorders also offer convenient portability and long battery life, making them ideal for capturing spontaneous moments on location. Furthermore, the ability to easily transfer recorded files to post-production platforms facilitates a seamless workflow for filmmakers.

The reliability and convenience of digital audio recorders make them indispensable tools for documentary filmmakers seeking to uphold professional standards in their sound recording process.

Condenser Shotgun Microphone.

The condenser shotgun microphone is a crucial tool for documentary filmmakers, offering exceptional directional sensitivity to capture clear and focused audio in dynamic environments. Its extended interference tube allows for precise sound pickup from a distance, making it ideal for recording interviews and capturing environmental sounds without unwanted background noise. With its ability to isolate the desired sound source, this microphone provides filmmakers with greater control over their audio recordings.

Featuring a narrow polar pattern, the condenser shotgun microphone can effectively capture sound from a specific direction while minimizing ambient noise. This makes it an invaluable asset when filming in crowded or noisy locations, allowing filmmakers to maintain the integrity of their audio recordings.

Additionally, the microphone’s high sensitivity and low self-noise ensure that even subtle nuances in speech or ambient sounds are faithfully captured, enhancing the overall quality of the documentary’s audio.

In conclusion, the condenser shotgun microphone empowers documentary filmmakers to achieve professional-grade audio recordings in diverse filming conditions. Its precision and versatility make it an essential tool for capturing clear and immersive soundscapes that elevate the storytelling process in documentary filmmaking.

Lavalier Microphones.

Lavalier microphones, also known as lapel or lav mics, have become an indispensable tool for documentary filmmakers due to their versatility and ability to capture high-quality audio in a variety of shooting conditions.

These small, discreet microphones can be easily attached to the clothing of subjects, allowing for clear and natural audio recordings during interviews and other on-the-go situations. With advancements in technology, lavalier microphones now come in wireless options, providing greater freedom of movement for both the subject and the filmmaker.

One of the key benefits of lavalier microphones is their ability to isolate and capture speech while minimizing background noise. This makes them ideal for capturing dialogue in crowded or noisy environments where traditional boom mics may struggle.

Additionally, lavalier microphones are often preferred for their unobtrusive nature, allowing subjects to forget about the mic’s presence and behave naturally on camera. When choosing a lavalier microphone for documentary filmmaking, it’s essential to consider factors such as sound quality, durability, and compatibility with your recording setup. Investing in a high-quality lavalier microphone can significantly enhance the overall audio production value of your documentary projects.

File Storage.

File storage is an essential component for documentary filmmakers, allowing them to organize and access their footage and project files efficiently. Different types of file storage options are available, from traditional hard drives to cloud-based solutions. Hard drives provide reliable and high-capacity storage but can be cumbersome to transport, while cloud-based options offer flexibility and accessibility but may require a stable internet connection.

Another consideration when choosing file storage is data security. Filmmakers must ensure that their files are protected from loss or unauthorized access. Utilizing encryption and regular backups can help safeguard sensitive footage and project files.

It’s also crucial to consider the scalability of the chosen file storage solution, as documentary projects often involve large amounts of data that may need to be expanded over time.

Regardless of the chosen file storage method, documentary filmmakers should prioritize organization and archiving practices to maintain a clear overview of their content.

Developing a structured filing system can save time and effort in locating specific footage or project elements during editing and post-production stages. By carefully selecting and managing their file storage, filmmakers can optimize their workflow and focus on creating impactful documentaries.

Camera Lenses.

Camera lenses are the window through which documentary filmmakers capture the world. Each lens offers a unique perspective, allowing filmmakers to convey emotion and storytelling through visual imagery. From wide-angle lenses that encompass vast landscapes to telephoto lenses that bring distant subjects into sharp focus, each lens has its own capabilities and strengths.

Documentary filmmakers often require a versatile range of lenses to adapt to various shooting conditions and scenarios. Prime lenses offer exceptional image quality and low-light performance, while zoom lenses provide flexibility in framing without the need for frequent lens changes. Additionally, specialty lenses such as macro or fisheye can add creative elements to documentary visuals, offering fresh angles for storytelling.

The choice of lens can significantly impact the audience’s perception and emotional connection with a documentary film. By carefully selecting the right combination of lenses, filmmakers can effectively convey their narrative vision and immerse audiences in the stories they tell. Understanding the capabilities and characteristics of different lenses is crucial for capturing compelling footage that resonates with viewers on a deep level.

Zoom Lens.

The Zoom Lens is an essential tool for documentary filmmakers, offering unparalleled versatility when it comes to capturing dynamic shots. With its ability to adjust focal length and magnification on the fly, this lens allows filmmakers to quickly adapt to changing scenes and perspectives without needing to switch lenses. This not only saves time but also enables a more seamless shooting experience, especially in fast-paced documentary environments.

One of the key advantages of using a zoom lens in documentary filmmaking is the ability to maintain a discreet distance from subjects while still being able to capture intimate moments. This can be particularly crucial when filming sensitive or emotionally charged situations, as it allows filmmakers to respect their subjects’ personal space while still obtaining compelling footage.

Additionally, the zoom lens offers greater creative control over composition and framing, enabling filmmakers to experiment with different perspectives and visual storytelling techniques without interrupting the flow of filming.

In summary, the zoom lens is a vital asset for documentary filmmakers seeking flexibility and adaptability in their visual storytelling. Its versatility and convenience make it an indispensable tool for capturing authentic moments while maintaining a respectful distance from subjects. By incorporating a zoom lens into their equipment arsenal, filmmakers can elevate the quality of their documentaries by effortlessly navigating various shooting scenarios and enhancing their creative vision.

Prosumer Camcorder.

The prosumer camcorder stands at the intersection of professional-grade functionality and consumer-friendly usability, making it an invaluable tool for documentary filmmakers. Packed with advanced features such as high-quality image sensors, manual controls, and interchangeable lenses, these camcorders offer a level of creative flexibility that surpasses traditional consumer models.

The ability to capture stunning visuals with cinematic depth of field and precise control over exposure settings allows filmmakers to elevate their storytelling through visual composition.

Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

Furthermore, prosumer camcorders often boast robust audio recording capabilities, including XLR inputs and independent volume controls. This enables filmmakers to capture pristine sound quality that is essential for documentary work where clear dialogue and ambient noise play a crucial role in immersing the audience in the subject matter.

Additionally, the ergonomic design and durability of prosumer camcorders make them well-suited for on-location shoots, ensuring that filmmakers can confidently navigate challenging environments while maintaining consistent production quality.

Professional Camcorder.

Professional camcorders are an essential tool for documentary filmmakers, offering high-quality video capture and a range of features to enhance the filmmaking process. With their advanced optics and image sensors, professional camcorders can deliver stunning visuals, even in challenging lighting conditions. Additionally, many models come equipped with built-in ND filters, XLR inputs for professional audio recording, and various manual controls to fine-tune the image settings.

One of the key advantages of professional camcorders is their ergonomic design, allowing filmmakers to comfortably shoot for extended periods without fatigue. This is particularly important for documentary filmmakers who often find themselves working in unpredictable environments and need a reliable tool to capture spontaneous moments.

Furthermore, professional camcorders typically offer robust battery life and interchangeable lens options to adapt to different shooting scenarios. Overall, investing in a professional camcorder can significantly elevate the production value of documentary filmmaking projects.

DJI Pocket Stabilised Camera.

The DJI Pocket Stabilised Camera is a game-changer for documentary filmmakers looking for ultra-portable, high-quality video solutions. With its compact design and built-in three-axis gimbal, this camera offers smooth and stabilized footage, making it ideal for capturing on-the-go moments without the need for bulky equipment.

The 4K resolution and excellent low-light performance ensure that even in challenging filming conditions, you can still achieve stunning results.

Additionally, the DJI Pocket’s intuitive controls and user-friendly interface make it a great choice for both experienced filmmakers and beginners alike. Its built-in microphone captures clear audio, reducing the need for external recording devices in many situations.

The ability to easily connect to smartphones for expanded functionality adds another layer of versatility to this already impressive piece of equipment. Overall, the DJI Pocket Stabilised Camera seems poised to become an essential tool in any documentary filmmaker’s arsenal, allowing them to capture high-quality footage with minimal hassle or setup time.

Mirrorless Camera.

As the technology of mirrorless cameras continues to advance, documentary filmmakers are finding these compact and versatile tools to be essential for their craft. The absence of a bulky mirror mechanism allows for smaller, lighter weight designs, perfect for capturing footage in on-the-go situations and remote locations.

With advancements in sensor technology, mirrorless cameras are now capable of delivering stunning 4K video quality, making them a formidable choice for capturing the visual richness of real-life stories.

Additionally, the ability to use interchangeable lenses provides filmmakers with a wide range of creative options when composing shots and adapting to different environments. The silent shooting mode found in many mirrorless cameras enables filmmakers to discreetly capture authentic moments without disturbing their subjects.

As an increasing number of professional photographers and videographers make the switch to mirrorless systems, it’s clear that these innovative cameras have become indispensable tools for documentary filmmaking.

Audio Recorder.

As documentary filmmakers, the audio recorder is an essential tool in capturing raw and authentic sound. With its ability to record high-quality audio in any environment, the audio recorder provides filmmakers with the flexibility to capture interviews, ambient sounds, and natural dialogue without compromise. This versatile device allows for precise control over sound levels and settings, ensuring that every moment is captured with clarity and depth.

Equipment Guide for Documentary Filmmakers

The portability of modern audio recorders enables filmmakers to easily move between different locations while maintaining consistent audio quality. Whether it’s a bustling city street or a serene natural landscape, the audio recorder excels at capturing the diverse soundscape of any documentary subject.

Additionally, many models offer convenient features such as built-in microphones, XLR inputs for external mics, and adjustable gain controls, empowering filmmakers to adapt to various recording scenarios with ease. As a result, documentary filmmakers can focus on storytelling while knowing that their audio recordings will complement their visual footage seamlessly.

Camera Light

Camera lights, also known as key lights, are used to illuminate the subject of the documentary. They create a warm, flattering light that enhances the appearance of the subject. The light is usually directed at the subject’s face, making it easy for the viewer to see the subject’s expressions and reactions. This is particularly useful in interviews where the emotions and reactions of the interviewee are a crucial part of the story.

Three-point Lighting Kit

A three-point lighting kit is a lighting setup that consists of a key light, a fill light, and a backlight. The key light illuminates the subject, the fill light fills in the shadows, and the backlight separates the subject from the background.

This setup is commonly used in documentary filmmaking to create a balanced, well-lit scene. It’s particularly useful when filming outdoors or in uncontrolled environments, as it allows the filmmaker to control the lighting conditions and achieve a professional-looking result g.

Shotgun Microphone

A shotgun microphone, also known as a lavalier microphone, is a type of microphone that is worn around the neck. It’s small, lightweight, and discreet, making it a popular choice for documentary filmmakers. The shotgun microphone is often used for on-camera interviews, as it allows the interviewer to speak naturally into the microphone without holding it up to their mouth. This results in clear, high-quality audio that is easy to edit.

Boom Pole

A boom pole is a long, adjustable arm that is used to hold a microphone or camera away from the filmmaker. It’s often used in situations where the filmmaker needs to capture audio or video without getting in the way.

For example, it can be used to capture the sound of a crowd or the view from a high vantage point. The boom pole can be adjusted to the desired height and angle, allowing the filmmaker to control the distance and angle of the microphone or camera

Wireless Lavalier Setup

A wireless lavalier setup is a system that allows the filmmaker to wear a microphone around their neck and have the audio transmitted wirelessly to a recording device. This setup is often used for on-camera interviews, as it allows the interviewer to speak naturally into the microphone without holding it up to their mouth. It’s also useful for capturing audio in noisy environments, as the wireless transmission can reduce background noise.

Rode Wireless GO II

The Rode Wireless GO II is a portable, wireless microphone that can be used for a variety of purposes, including on-camera interviews and location sound recording. It’s lightweight and easy to use, making it a popular choice for documentary filmmakers. The microphone can be paired with a mobile device or computer for recording, and it can be powered by a battery or a power bank.

Rode Lavalier

The Rode Lavalier is a type of lavalier microphone that is worn around the neck. It’s compact, lightweight, and discreet, making it a popular choice for on-camera interviews and location sound recording. The microphone is small enough to be worn comfortably for extended periods, and it can be paired with a mobile device or computer for recording. The Rode Lavalier is known for its high-quality audio and ease of use.

Velbon 638F Tripod

The Velbon 638F is a professional-grade tripod that is used to stabilize the camera during filming. It has a center column that can be adjusted to different heights and angles, allowing the filmmaker to capture shots from various perspectives.

The tripod also has a three-legged base that can be locked in place to prevent it from tipping over. This stability is crucial in documentary filmmaking, as it allows the filmmaker to capture clear, steady shots even in challenging conditions.

Pan and Tilt Head

A pan and tilt head is a device that is attached to the camera and allows the filmmaker to move the camera up, down, left, and right without having to move the camera itself. This is particularly useful for filming wide shots or tracking movements. The pan and tilt head can be operated manually or remotely, allowing the filmmaker to capture dynamic scenes without having to physically move the camera.

Camera Support

Camera supports are used to hold the camera steady during filming, particularly when using a tripod or a crane. They can be attached to the camera or the tripod, and they provide extra support that helps to prevent camera shake and ensure that the shot is stable and clear. Camera supports are essential for capturing high-quality footage, especially in challenging conditions or when filming on unstable surfaces.

Camera Stabilizer

Camera stabilizers are devices that are used to reduce camera shake and ensure that the shot is steady and clear. They are often used in conjunction with a tripod or a crane, and they can be attached to the camera or the support. Camera stabilizers work by counteracting the movement of the camera, which helps to prevent blur and ensure that the shot is sharp and clear. This is particularly useful in documentary filmmaking, where the filmmaker often needs to capture clear shots in challenging conditions or during fast-paced action .

Camera Slider

A camera slider is a device that is used to move the camera along a track. It’s often used in filmmaking to create smooth, continuous movements and to capture wide or panoramic shots. The slider can be operated manually or remotely, allowing the filmmaker to control the speed and direction of the movement. This is particularly useful in documentary filmmaking, where the filmmaker often needs to capture dynamic scenes or wide shots.

Camera Dolly

A camera dolly is a device that is used to move the camera smoothly along a track. It’s often used in filmmaking to create smooth, continuous movements and to capture wide or panoramic shots. The dolly can be operated manually or remotely, allowing the filmmaker to control the speed and direction of the movement. This is particularly useful in documentary filmmaking, where the filmmaker often needs to capture dynamic scenes or wide shots.

Camera Jib

A camera jib is a device that is used to raise or lower the camera above the ground. It’s often used in filmmaking to capture high-angle shots or to film from a unique perspective. The jib can be operated manually or remotely, allowing the filmmaker to control the height of the camera. This is particularly useful in documentary filmmaking, where the filmmaker often needs to capture unique or innovative shots.

Camera Crane

A camera crane is a device that is used to move the camera in three dimensions: up, down, and side to side. It’s often used in filmmaking to create dynamic, cinematic shots. The crane can be operated manually or remotely, allowing the filmmaker to control the movement of the camera.

Headphones

Headphones are an essential part of a documentary filmmaker’s toolkit. They are used to listen to audio cues, dialogue, and music during the filming process. They also allow the filmmaker to communicate with actors, crew members, and other individuals without disturbing the audio recording. Headphones can also be used to monitor the audio levels in real-time, which is crucial for ensuring that the audio is of good quality and that there are no unexpected noises or disturbances.

HD Video Cameras

HD video cameras are used to capture high-definition video footage for documentaries. They offer a high level of detail and clarity, which is crucial for creating a professional-looking documentary. HD video cameras can also be equipped with various features, such as zoom lenses and stabilization systems, which can enhance the quality of the footage and make it easier to capture dynamic scenes.

Cinema Camera

A cinema camera is a type of camera that is used in film and television production. It offers high-quality video and audio recording, which is crucial for creating a professional-looking documentary. Cinema cameras are often used in documentaries to capture cinematic shots and to give the documentary a film-like quality. They can also be equipped with various features, such as zoom lenses and stabilization systems, which can enhance the quality of the footage and make it easier to capture dynamic scenes.

iPhone

An iPhone can be used as a documentary filmmaking tool in several ways. It can be used to record audio interviews, capture still images, and even as a lightweight camera for shooting footage. The iPhone’s built-in features, such as the microphone, the camera, and the ability to record high-quality audio and video, make it a versatile tool for documentary filmmakers.

Additionally, the iPhone’s compatibility with various apps allows the filmmaker to add additional features and capabilities to their filmmaking process.

Tripod

A tripod is a device that is used to stabilize the camera during filming. It has a center column that can be adjusted to different heights and angles, allowing the filmmaker to capture shots from various perspectives.

The tripod also has a three-legged base that can be locked in place to prevent it from tipping over. This stability is crucial in documentary filmmaking, as it allows the filmmaker to capture clear, steady shots even in challenging conditions.

DSLR Camera

A DSLR (Digital Single-Lens Reflex) camera is a type of camera that is used in professional filmmaking and photography. It offers high-quality video and image recording, which is crucial for creating a professional-looking documentary.

DSLR cameras are often equipped with various features, such as zoom lenses, interchangeable lenses, and high-resolution sensors, which can enhance the quality of the footage and make it easier to capture dynamic scenes.

They also offer manual controls, which allow the filmmaker to have more control over the shooting process. You should read another article i wrote about >>>> Case Study: Successful Documentary Filmmakers Of All Time to learn more.